Motivation

I have no motivation. I can’t be asked.
Need to shower before I go to work but I can’t be asked to move.

thebikingsquirrel:

Heading off into the woods

Oh for a fun ride

thebikingsquirrel:

Heading off into the woods

Oh for a fun ride

(via d0wnscape)

sportlifeon:

Don’t hit the camera!!!

How does this end

sportlifeon:

Don’t hit the camera!!!

How does this end

blazepress:

18 Tree Roots Winning the Fight against Concrete

Follow BlazePress on TumblrFacebook and Twitter.

Just a biy creepy following the patterns

(Source: blazepress)

rail-life-talk:

Nathan’s story

WARNING: This film contains graphic images that some viewers might find disturbing.

The real life story of Nathan showing the dangers that electricity can pose on the railway. 

Winner of best health and safety film at the IVCA Awards 2013.

sportlifeon:

Surfer in a storm

sportlifeon:

Surfer in a storm

fohk:

If we admit that human life can be ruled by reason, then all possibility of life is destroyed”

Into the Wild (2007)
Sean Penn

(via contraception)

(Source: krimsons, via aliciaaadani)

photosworthseeing:

keithaltonphotography:

To me the most interesting photographs tend to have achieved a delicate balance between light and shadow. So I try to achieve that in my own work. The beauty of light is defined by the shadows that shape it. 

 Gentle, serene, and intimately beautiful. I adore simple portraits that really draw you into the eyes and soul of the subject. Especially when those eyes are so tender and full of stories. 

photosworthseeing:

keithaltonphotography:

To me the most interesting photographs tend to have achieved a delicate balance between light and shadow. So I try to achieve that in my own work. The beauty of light is defined by the shadows that shape it. 

 Gentle, serene, and intimately beautiful. I adore simple portraits that really draw you into the eyes and soul of the subject. Especially when those eyes are so tender and full of stories. 

trynottodrown:

SeaWorld could be in trouble because of “Granny,” the world’s oldest known living orca. The 103-year-old whale (also known as J2) was recently spotted off Canada’s western coast with her pod — her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. But while the Granny sighting is thrilling for us, it’s problematic for SeaWorld.
First of all, SeaWorld has claimed that “no one knows for sure how long killer whales live,” when simple figures or even living and thriving examples — like Granny — can give us a pretty good idea. The Whale and Dolphin Conservation project estimates that whales born in captivity only live to 4.5 years old, on average; many of SeaWorld’s orcas die before they reach their 20s. Perhaps because of their reduced lifespans, the whales are forced to breed continuously and at perilously young ages, which could also diminish their overall health.
Another key aspect of an orca’s life — which is missing in captivity — is the ability to swim up to 100 miles per day. When Granny was spotted earlier this week, she had just finished an 800-mile trek from northern California along with her pod. According to animal welfare advocates, long-distance swimming is integral to orcas’ psychological health and well-being; SeaWorld, however, has gone on record claiming that orcas do not need to swim hundreds of miles regularly, ostensibly to defend the parks’ cruel practice of keeping massive, powerful orcas confined to cramped tanks.
Since Granny was first spotted (as early as the 1930s), she’s believed to have mothered two calves, who in turn have had calves of their own. (One of her grandchildren, Canuck, reportedly died at the age of 4 after being captured and held at SeaWorld). As her pod has grown, Granny has kept up with them — without being separated through human intervention — and traveled astonishing distances with her pod annually. Orcas at SeaWorld are routinely separated from their pods, which has been known to cause huge mental and emotional strain and can prevent calves from developing normally.
Granny doesn’t simply represent an impressive feat of nature; she embodies what’s wrong with SeaWorld by being a living example of what’s right in the wild. While it’s true that most wild orcas don’t live as long as Granny has, their lifespans are still dramatically longer than those of SeaWorld’s whales (the NOAA estimates that wild female orcas, like Granny, live an average of 50 to 60 years). Their lives are also filled with much more swimming, exploration, variety and bonding with family — in other words, their lives are likely filled with much more joy.
SeaWorld and marine parks profit off keeping orcas and other marine animals in captivity — despite evidence that captivity not only induces unnatural behaviors in whales, but also endangers trainers. Join us in pledging never to visit SeaWorld or other marine parks until they empty their orca tanks.
(source)

trynottodrown:

SeaWorld could be in trouble because of “Granny,” the world’s oldest known living orca. The 103-year-old whale (also known as J2) was recently spotted off Canada’s western coast with her pod — her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. But while the Granny sighting is thrilling for us, it’s problematic for SeaWorld.

First of all, SeaWorld has claimed that “no one knows for sure how long killer whales live,” when simple figures or even living and thriving examples — like Granny — can give us a pretty good idea. The Whale and Dolphin Conservation project estimates that whales born in captivity only live to 4.5 years old, on average; many of SeaWorld’s orcas die before they reach their 20s. Perhaps because of their reduced lifespans, the whales are forced to breed continuously and at perilously young ages, which could also diminish their overall health.

Another key aspect of an orca’s life — which is missing in captivity — is the ability to swim up to 100 miles per day. When Granny was spotted earlier this week, she had just finished an 800-mile trek from northern California along with her pod. According to animal welfare advocates, long-distance swimming is integral to orcas’ psychological health and well-being; SeaWorld, however, has gone on record claiming that orcas do not need to swim hundreds of miles regularly, ostensibly to defend the parks’ cruel practice of keeping massive, powerful orcas confined to cramped tanks.

Since Granny was first spotted (as early as the 1930s), she’s believed to have mothered two calves, who in turn have had calves of their own. (One of her grandchildren, Canuck, reportedly died at the age of 4 after being captured and held at SeaWorld). As her pod has grown, Granny has kept up with them — without being separated through human intervention — and traveled astonishing distances with her pod annually. Orcas at SeaWorld are routinely separated from their pods, which has been known to cause huge mental and emotional strain and can prevent calves from developing normally.

Granny doesn’t simply represent an impressive feat of nature; she embodies what’s wrong with SeaWorld by being a living example of what’s right in the wild. While it’s true that most wild orcas don’t live as long as Granny has, their lifespans are still dramatically longer than those of SeaWorld’s whales (the NOAA estimates that wild female orcas, like Granny, live an average of 50 to 60 years). Their lives are also filled with much more swimming, exploration, variety and bonding with family — in other words, their lives are likely filled with much more joy.

SeaWorld and marine parks profit off keeping orcas and other marine animals in captivity — despite evidence that captivity not only induces unnatural behaviors in whales, but also endangers trainers. Join us in pledging never to visit SeaWorld or other marine parks until they empty their orca tanks.

(source)

(via heyitsbob)

deaths-praises:

Young people were hit far harder by the recession than older generations, a report has found.

People aged 22-30 saw their household incomes fall by 13% between 2007 and 2013, while those between 31 and 59 saw a 7% drop, according to the Institute of Fiscal Studies (IFS).

Employment prospects for the under-30s were also hit harder.

Living standards are set to be a key issue in the run-up to next year’s general election.

While the government has focused on the economic recovery, the opposition Labour party says living standards have yet to improve for too many people.

Well no shit, of course we are. We’re charged for education that was free for our parents, given zero-hour contracts in dead-end jobs if we can even find one, forced to pay outrageous rents to a vampire generation who see property as an investment rather than a basic human right and then constantly told that we’re apathetic, lazy and self-obsessed by a political and media class that completely ignores us.

We’re not the ones who ruined the economy, those in power are, and whilst they’re squabbling about which party fucked everything up (they both did) we’re sat with our fingers up our arses watching on. Meanwhile, they’re using the economic dire straits to push through the destruction of the welfare state, sell off and privatise what little public services we have left at knock-down prices for their friends and keep us distracted by blaming immigrants, or the disabled, or the the unemployed, or whoever they can think of next.

Fuck them all.

(via lukealive)

timelordinvictorious:

pandifreyan:

thatscienceguy:

What happens when you rotate Copper Sulfate while it is on fire!

I think Maleficent is about to appear. 

Diagonally

timelordinvictorious:

pandifreyan:

thatscienceguy:

What happens when you rotate Copper Sulfate while it is on fire!

I think Maleficent is about to appear. 

Diagonally

(via lukealive)